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Interview Characteristics To Avoid

Barclay Anderson IT RecruitmentCompany BlogInterview Characteristics To Avoid

Mar

24

Interview Characteristics To Avoid

I tend to spend a lot of my time lecturing you all on how to make you stand out from the crowd. Well, on this post I decided I’d do things a little differently: what NOT to do!

  • Speaking Negatively:

Especially when it comes to previous employers. “I didn’t get on with my boss” is a sure fire way to bring the ticks on the boxes way back down! When asked your reasons as to why you’ve left previous positions, make sure you stay professional and don’t turn into a gossiping school girl!

  • Confidence:

We already know how important it is to come across as confident at interview stage. However there really is a fine line between being confident and cocky.
We see a lot of candidates come and go who can come across as arrogant and untrustworthy; almost like they feel as if the client should be begging them to take the job. Don’t be one of these people!

There’s the other side of the coin too: a confidence lack. This doesn’t tend to be as much of a problem as being over-confident, but it’s definitely something to keep in mind. Employers can be lenient as it’s natural for interviewees to be nervous, but it can give them doubts as to whether you’ll be able to communicate well with colleagues and third parties.

  • Bad Manners:

We’ve had a number of instances lately where candidates have gone into interview without even taking their jacket off. From an employer’s point of view, this comes across as though you really don’t want to be there. Also are you even wearing a suit under that winter coat or are you still in your pyjamas?

It goes without saying to be polite and courteous, respectful and appearing professional. Jump in the shower, spritz some deodorant and have a shave blokes!

  • Salary Focus

From conducting interviews myself, in my opinion one of the worst things a candidate can do is focus entirely on the salary and benefits of the job.

Yeah, it’s great if there are added bonuses and benefits to the position you’re looking for, but from a first impression point of view, asking questions entirely on this topic will paint you in a bad light. Look for the role you want and not just go for it because of the salary. Three months down the line you may regret accepting a job you hate for a £2K increase from your last position.

First impressions matter.

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– Millie McCormick

millie circle